…behind the word

Langue d’oïl

Origin of the word: ABBOT/ABBESS

Abbot /masculine noun, plural: abbots/ (English): before 900

Abbess /feminine noun, plural: abbesses/ (English): 1275-1325

> In another languages:

  • Abad (m)/Abadesa (f) (Español)
  • Abade (m)/Abadessa (f) (Português)
  • Abt (m)/Äbtissin (f) (Deutsch)
  • Abbé (m)/Abbesse (f) (Français)
  • Abate (m)/Badessa (f)(Italiano)

> From:

Abbot:

  • Old English abbod:  abbot.
  • Lat. abbas, abbātis: abbot, (religious) father.
  • Gr. ἀββᾶ (‘a·bba), ἀββᾶς (‘a·bbas): abbot, (religious) father.
  • Syriac ܐܒܐ (‘a.bā): father, abbot (it’s first used with this sense in the Syrian monasteries).
  • Aramaic אבא (‘a·bā): father.

Abbess:

  • Old French abbesse, abaesse: abbess. This word replace the Old English one that had came directly from Latin.
  • Old English abadisseabbodesse: abbess.
  • Lat. abbātissa: abbess, (religious) mother (feminine of abbas).
  • Gr. ἀββᾶ (‘a·bba), ἀββᾶς (‘a·bbas): abbot, (religious) father.
  • Syriac ܐܒܐ (‘a.bā): father, abbot (it’s first used with this sense in the Syrian monasteries).
  • Aramaic אבא (‘a·bā): father.

> Meaning:

  • Present: A man who is in charge of a monastery (m)/a woman who is in charge of a convent (f) (Cambridge Dictionary). A man who is the head of an abbey of monks (m)/a woman who is the head of an abbey of nuns (f) (Oxford Dictionary).
  • Original: (Religious) father (m)/(religious) she-father (f).

Origin of the word: ABATE

Abate /verb/ (English): 1300-1350

> In another languages:

With the same roots:

  • Abatir (Español)
  • Abater (Português)
  • Abattre (Français)
  • Abbattere (Italiano)

With another roots:

  • Abflauen (Deutsch): ab– (away, off, down) + flauen, flau (weak, slack).

> From:

  • Old French abatre: to beat down, to cast down, to knock down, to fell.
  • Lat. ad battuĕre: ad (to, at, preposition of intensity) battuĕre (to beat).

> Meaning:

  • Present: To become less strong (Cambridge Dictionary). Become less intense or widespread; cause to become smaller or less intense; lessen, reduce, or remove (Oxford Dictionary).
  • Original: To beat down.

Origin of the word: ABASE

Abase /verb/ (English): 1470-1480

> In another languages:

With the same roots:

  • Rebajar/Bajar, abajar (Español)
  • Rebaixar/Abaixar (Português)
  • Abaisser (Français)
  • Abbassar (Italiano)

With another roots:

  • Erniedrigen/Senken (Deutsch): erniedrigen (to humiliate, to degrade) from niedrig (low, plebeian); senken (to lower) related to sinken (to sink, to go down).

> From:

  • Old French abaissier: to diminish, to make lower in value or status.
  • Lat. ad bassiare: to bring lower. This term from Lat. bassus: low in stature.

> Meaning:

  • Present: To make yourself seem to be less important or not to deserve respect (Cambridge Dictionary). Behave in a way so as to belittle or degrade (Oxford Dictionary).
  • Original: To put in a lower position.

Origin of the word: ABANDON

Abandon /verb/ (English): 1325-1375

> In another languages:

With the same roots:

  • Abandonar (Español)
  • Abandonar (Português)
  • Abandonner (Français)
  • Abbandonare (Italiano)

With another roots:

  • Verlassen (Deutsch): ver– (out) + lassen (to leave).

> From:

  • Old French (mettre) a bandon: (mettre [put]) + a (to, under) + bandon (jurisdiction, power).

The Old French word bandon, as well as the English word ban, was related to:

  • Old English bannan: to summon by proclamation; to proclaim.
  • Old High German bannan: to command.
  • Old Norse banna: to forbid.
  • Lat. bannum: decree, proclamation, edict.
  • Gr. φάναι (‘pha·nai): to say.

> Meaning:

  • Present: To leave a place, thing or person forever; to stop doing an activity before you have finished it (Cambridge Dictionary). Give up completely; cease to support or look after, desert; allow oneself to indulge in (Oxford Dictionary).
  • Original: To give up to a public ban.